Curriculum

Our Curriculum

Springhall British School (EYFS & Primary) implements the British Early Years Foundation Stage curriculum in the preschool and British National Curriculum in the primary. Children in the preschool learn, are observed and supported through the seven Learning Area of the EYFS curriculum while in accordance with the National Curriculum, all children in primary study the eleven subjects (including Religious Education) identified as essential to the child's all- round learning, planned to balance over the whole year.
The International Primary Curriculum is also an integral part of our curriculum, providing an international element and you will often find our children working through the strands.

Springhall British Primary School follows the British Curriculum, which divides into Key Stages (KS), based on age groups, as seen below:

Age Year Stage Assessment
2 - 3 Pre-School EYFS Through the form of Observation
3 - 4 Nursery EYFS Through the form of Observation

4 - 5

Reception

EYFS
Through the form of Observation
&
Early Learning Goal in each area

5 - 6

1

Key Stage 1
Phonics screening test,
Reading age test
& Internal Assessment
6 - 7 2 Key Stage 1 GL & SAT
7 - 8 3 Key Stage 2 Cambridge
8 - 9 4 Key Stage 2 Cambridge
9 - 10 5 Key Stage 2 Cambridge
10 - 11 6 Key Stage 2 Cambridge

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)


The Springhall British School EYFS Curriculum is divided up into Seven Areas of Learning and Development, which are:


Focusses on children's mental and physical wellbeing. Children work on long-term skills and awareness to build a healthy foundation they can take forward. It's divided into these topics:

  • Self-Regulation
  • Managing Self
  • Building Relationships
Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) provides children with lots of social opportunities. Children can learn to form healthy bonds and make stable, lasting friendships. For example, they’ll learn what the right and wrong things to do are, alongside respect, compassion, morals, and lots more socio-emotional skills.
The subject also opens children up to discuss their thoughts and feelings. This can help them to form a level of ownership, independence, and self-esteem.

Encourages conversations and spoken language skills. Underpinning all skills, it's foundational for children to be able to interact with their peers and their learning environment. It's split into the following distinct areas:

  • Listening, Attention and Understanding
  • Speaking
There’s a lot more to language development and communication than simply ‘talking’. It refers to the variety of ways that children take in information, and communicate information - only a part of this is used with spoken words. Words and image association is one of the best forms of initiating language and communication development. This is why reading books to young children is a great way of bringing this out, since they’ll be able to make a connection with the pictures in the book, and the text you’re reading out.

It’s important for practitioners to upkeep the support in early years provisions surrounding C+L, as a part of the EYFS seven areas of learning. Lots of children are increasingly beginning school with underdeveloped communication and speech skills. 

Is vital for healthy lives, as well as affecting other areas of learning. Both gross and fine motor skills are developed over Early Years in activities like writing and cutting. Practitioners plan by looking at these specific areas:

  • Gross Motor Skills
  • Fine Motor Skills
As children move around, they’re exploring the world around them through handling objects. If children are exposed to healthy eating and leading an active lifestyle, they’re likely to continue those positive habits as time goes on. By children having regular physical activity in their lives, it’ll promote healthy development, growth, composition, and cardiovascular fitness. Physical development activities help children to control and manage their body movements and control. It also improves brain development, too, such as critical thinking skills and concentration, since physical fitness ensures heightened brain function.

Skills will form a strong foundation for children's school careers, and are split simply into:

  • Comprehension
  • Word Reading
  • Writing
With literacy, as a part of the EYFS seven areas of learning, children begin to build connections between spoken sounds and the letters in writing. In order to achieve this, they’ll need to start forming levels of experience with letters and words, pictures and objects, and sounds. Communicating through written language is an essential part for many areas of daily living.

Area of learning focusses on simple concepts that are foundational to higher maths topics in KS1 and up. In EYFS children focus on the maths areas of:

  • Number
  • Numerical Patterns
Learning maths can help with life skills such as spatial awareness, shapes and measurement, and problem-solving. Maths also serves for other uses like handling and managing money, telling the time, so they’re not late for any commitments they have in place, or working out distance and time together, so that they can travel.

Supports children's learning about the surrounding environment. In this area of learning, children can explore new cultures and better understand basics that we often take for granted.

  • Past and Present
  • People, Culture, and Communities
  • The Natural World
Children will discover similarities and differences, what world and what doesn’t, what they can and cannot change, and why certain things happen within the world around them. There are lots of opportunities to experiment and investigate. From this subject out of the EYFS seven areas of learning, children can make observations and form their own opinions and theories.

As well as learning about societies and communities, cultures, people, and places, there are elements of science within this type of learning, too. For example, children will learn about the environment, such as weather conditions, plants, and wildlife.

Supports children's creative development and expression. It helps children create their own art works and encourages them to value their own thoughts, opinions and skills. The two areas in this area of learning are:

  • Creating with Materials
  • Being Imaginative and Expressive
Expressive arts is one of the EYFS seven areas of learning, which provides emotive sharing. They’ll be using a range of materials and activities in order to express themselves through imaginative play. This is as well as to communicate, since verbal communication can be limited at such a young age. These activities include design and technology, dance, movement, music, art, and role-play.

Early years practitioners will plan activities to cover these seven Areas of Learning. Throughout the day or session, children will have the opportunity to complete activities that cover many, if not all, of EYFS Seven the Areas of Learning and Development.

Key Stage 1 & 2


The Springhall British School Key Stage 1 & 2 has the following subjects for students:


Core Subjects

At Springhall, through the reading of high-quality texts, pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Reading, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society; pupils, therefore, who do not learn to speak, read and write fluently and confidently are effectively disenfranchised.

Aims:

The overarching aim for the teaching of English at Springhall is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Through the National Curriculum for English we aim to ensure that all pupils: 

  • Read easily, fluently and with good understanding 
  • Develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • Appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • Use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • Are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate.

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that has been developed over centuries, providing the solution to some of history’s most intriguing problems. It is essential to everyday life, critical to science, technology and engineering, and necessary for financial literacy and most forms of employment. A high-quality mathematics education therefore provides a foundation for understanding the world, the ability to reason mathematically, an appreciation of the beauty and power of mathematics, and a sense of enjoyment and curiosity about the subject.

Aims:

The Springhall British curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • Reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • Can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and nonroutine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.
Mathematics is an interconnected subject in which pupils need to be able to move fluently between representations of mathematical ideas. The programmes of study are, by necessity, organised into apparently distinct domains, but pupils should make rich connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to science and other subjects.

The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

Aims:

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.



Foundation Subjects

Art, craft and design embody some of the highest forms of human creativity. A high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

Aim:

The Springhall British Curriculum for art and design aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

If our children do not know how machines work, how can they design them to work better?
Computing is an integral component of the curriculum. Teaching children to think computationally is essential learning. Computational thinking grows children into problem solver, sequence checkers, creative and logical thinkers. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. Ensuring that children become digitally literate i.e. able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology and new technologies, is education for the future workplace and preparation for them to become active participants in a digital world.


Key characteristics of Computational thinkers:
  • Think abstractly: ability to work out which bits of information are needed to solve problems by learning to disregard unnecessary detail
  • Think ahead: ability to analyse the different aspects of the problem, the input, the outputs, the variables, validation etc.
  • Think procedurally: ability to work step-by-step through a problem, dividing it into sections. Being therefore able to dissect the problem into manageable steps rather than just focusing on the end results
  • Think logically: predicting and analysing problems – once they have created the program being able to look back and see where errors have occurred and having the patience to do this
  • Think concurrently: spotting similarities
In short computational thinking teaches children how to think through a problem, how to tackle a problem and how to work at a problem when the result is not as expected. Computational learning teaches children patience and resilience and trains them to spot errors more easily.

There are four aspects to the learning and teaching of computing:
  • Coding: This concept involves developing an understanding of transcriptions, logic and sequences
  • Connect: This concept involves developing an understanding of how to safely connect to others
  • Communication: This concept involves using APPS to communicate one’s ideas
  • Collect: This concept involves developing and understanding of databases and their uses
Keystage 1 Keystage 2
Understand what algorithms are (a set of step-by-step instructions for carrying out a function), how they are used as programs on digital devices, and that programmes work by following these precise instructions.

Create and debug (find and remove errors from) simple computer programs.

Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.

Use technology to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.

Recognise common uses of information technology in the wider world.Recognise common uses of information technology in the wider world.

Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping their personal information private.

Know where to go for help and support if they’re worried about anything they see on the internet or other online technologies.
Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.

Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.

Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.

Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and program.

Understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration.

Use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content.

Select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information.

Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly.

Recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Aims:

The Springhall British curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Aims:

The Springhall British Curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • Are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
    • Collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
    • Interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
    • Communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Aims:

The Springhall British Curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • Know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. A highquality music education should engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As pupils progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical canon.

Aims:

The Springhall British Curriculum for music aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions, including the works of the great composers and musicians
  • Learn to sing and to use their voices, to create and compose music on their own and with others, have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument, use technology appropriately and have the opportunity to progress to the next level of musical excellence
  • Understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated, including through the inter-related dimensions: pitch, duration, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure and appropriate musical notations.

A high-quality physical education curriculum inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. It should provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect.

Aims:

The national curriculum for physical education aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • Are physically active for sustained periods of time
  • Engage in competitive sports and activities
  • lead healthy, active lives.

Learning a foreign language is a liberation from insularity and provides an opening to other cultures. A high-quality languages education should foster pupils’ curiosity and deepen their understanding of the world. The teaching should enable pupils to express their ideas and thoughts in another language and to understand and respond to its speakers, both in speech and in writing. It should also provide opportunities for them to communicate for practical purposes, learn new ways of thinking and read great literature in the original language. Language teaching should provide the foundation for learning further languages, equipping pupils to study and work in other countries.

Aims:

The national curriculum for french aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Understand and respond to spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources
  • Speak with increasing confidence, fluency and spontaneity, finding ways of communicating what they want to say, including through discussion and asking questions, and continually improving the accuracy of their pronunciation and intonation
  • Can write at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using the variety of grammatical structures that they have learnt
  • Discover and develop an appreciation of a range of writing in french

Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education is an important and necessary part of all pupils’ education. Springhall British School teach PSHE, drawing on good practice, and this expectation is outlined in the introduction to the proposed new British curriculum.

PSHE is a non-statutory subject. To allow teachers the flexibility to deliver high-quality PSHE we consider it unnecessary to provide new standardised frameworks or programmes of study. PSHE can encompass many areas of study. Teachers are best placed to understand the needs of their pupils and do not need additional central prescription.

However, while we believe Springhall British School tailors their local PSHE programme to reflect the needs of its pupils, we use PSHE education programme to equip pupils with a sound understanding of risk and with the knowledge and skills necessary to make safe and informed decisions.

Springhall British School seek to use PSHE education to build, where appropriate, on the statutory content already outlined in the British curriculum, the basic school curriculum and in statutory guidance on: drug education, financial education, sex and relationship education (SRE) and the importance of physical activity and diet for a healthy lifestyle.


Address

Springhall British School, 35 Danube Street, Maitama, Abuja Nigeria


Contacts

Email: registrar@springhallbritishschool.org
Phone: +234 916 668 1921

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